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Christian Tantric Meditation Book Reviews

We have been very blessed to receive positive book reviews at Amazon.com from Bruce Alderman Integral Scholar, Rev. Lou Kavar PhD, and Kim Waters Rose LPC.  Excerpts from those reviews are included below:

A Luminous Guide to Living the Fruits of the Spirit, Bruce Alderman Integral Scholar

Bruce AldermanFor many people, the word ‘tantra’ either evokes images of exotic, arcane rituals or ancient erotic arts. While these associations with the term are not entirely inaccurate, they obscure the essence of tantric practice, which is a sophisticated, artful means of human self-cultivation and self-transformation. In the Christian Tantric Meditation Guide, David Miller has beautifully distilled several essential elements of this practice and has applied them, quite fruitfully and imaginatively, within a Christian context.

Miller’s patient, gentle approach in this text makes the navigation of unfamiliar concepts and practices almost seamless, and his explication and frequent illumination of these concepts with Christian scriptural passages and images helps to demonstrate the relevance and power of these tantric exercises for deepening Christian practice. This book is not only for Christians, however.

I expect it will also be of interest to Western Buddhists who may have had Christian or Jewish roots, or who may be sympathetic to Christian tradition; to ‘spiritual but not religious’ practitioners who appreciate the archetypal power of religious language and imagery; to interfaith dialogue practitioners; and to individuals interested in the emerging integral and interspiritual approaches of Ken Wilber, Thich Nhat Hanh, Brother Wayne Teasdale, Bede Griffiths, Kurt Johnson, Cynthia Bourgeault, Beatrice Bruteau, the Dalai Lama, and many others. Highly recommended.

Insightful for those moving beyond traditional Christianity Rev Lou Kavar PhD.

Rev Lou Kavar-trimmedAs a spiritual director, I’ve worked with many individuals who find that their spiritual path leads them from the Christian tradition of their family to explore forms of Buddhist meditation. Few books integrate these two traditions in a way that reflects such spiritual journeys. Miller’s book presents a clearly organized approach that blends Buddhist practice with Christian metaphor in a way that many people will find comfortable. The book is an important addition to spiritual literature which will be useful for those exploring beyond traditional Christian spirituality and belief.

A great bridge between philosophies KIm Waters Rose LPC

Kim Waters RoseAs a Licensed Professional Counselor, many of my clients often struggle with stress and learning how to quiet their mind. With hectic schedules and little time for themselves, more and more counselors are turning to Buddhist techniques and principles for use in therapy because they are helpful and consistent with sound psychological healing practices. What this book does is help to make these principles and techniques accessible to Christian clients.

The chapter on mindful “self emptying” can be useful to therapists and clients alike. This practice helps a person to be “fully present” for another, and increases self awareness of the inner desires, attachments and resentments, and fears that can interfere with being
“fully present.”

One of the things I appreciate about this book is the emphasis on balance in
life and practice. For example, in the chapter describing “Divine Communion”,
the female “Mary-Sophia” aspect of what it means to be a person made in the image of God is an integral part of the process, and is presented in a way that includes both Old and New Testament biblical references.

Another example of balance is provided in the chapter describing compassion,
where the importance of healthy boundaries is emphasized. Understanding of the problems associated with codependency inform an approach to compassion that increases self-awareness of unhealthy motivations and cycles that can contribute to codependent behaviors.

One of the most powerful experiences a person can gain from this book is the integration and acceptance of self – made in the Image of God – as human, Divine, and Spirit in nature. This exercise in self integration occurs as part of the “compassion for self” practice.

Over all I would highly recommend this book for anyone who has a desire to experience the benefits of meditation and has a cultural, religious, or Spiritual connection with Christianity.